Book Review – Letters from the Dead by Steve Robinson

Book Review – Letters from the Dead by Steve Robinson

That’s it! I am up to date and thoroughly unimpressed about it. What am I going to do without a dose of JT for another year? It’s taken me just over a month to get through the seven books in Steve Robinson’s genealogical mystery series. Steve, may I call you Steve? It’s been a great adventure.

Letters from the dead is the brand-new instalment released earlier this month.

About letters from the Dead

JT is back and settling into life in England with his wife, Jean, and their 5-month-old baby, Ben.

He’s getting back into rebuilding his career as a professional genealogist. The cases he has taken 0h so far have been run of the mill- that is until Damian Sinclair employs JT’s services to identify the biological father of an illegitimate ancestor-one that is linked to an Indian treasure that hasn’t been seen in over 150 years.

Finally, something for JT to get his teeth into.

Things aren’t as they first appear, Sinclair’s real motive for employing JT isn’t as innocent as he first claims.

As JT’s stay in the Scottish Highlands progresses, he realises his life could, once again, be on the line.
Will JT get out of this assignment unscathed?
What bloody secrets will be revealed?

My Review

As always JT’s adventures as a genealogist enthral me. Steve Robinson’s presentation of the multiple stories within the book is brilliant.

I am always left wondering how one genealogist can walk into so many life changing situations in

The details appear to be well researched and the part of the story taking place in India are certainly believable. Although, I know little about Indian history and must take many of the details at face Value.

I have enjoyed JT’s adventures greatly, and it’s good to see that despite settling down with his family, he still has a sense of adventure.

I am very much looking forward to the next Jefferson Tayte adventure.

The Jefferson Tayte Genealogical mystery series can be bought on Amazon using the links below.

 

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com.

 

Book Review – Dying Games by Steve Robinson

Book Review – Dying Games by Steve Robinson

I made easy work out of the first 6 of Steve Robinson’s Jefferson Tayte series, reading them within 7 weeks with other books in between.

I think the appeal of the Jefferson Tayte series is that it combines two of my favourite things – genealogy and reading. Dying Games certainly appeals to the crime fiction fan in me.

About Dying Games

After the danger of his own genealogical journey in Munich, JT and Jean are ready to take things a little easier. Planning their future is a full-time business. That is, until JT receives a call from DC.

There’s a serial killer on the loose and all the victims have one thing in common.  Jefferson Tayte.

Who is killing the relatives of JT’s previous clients?
Will JT need to play this genealogical game until the very end?
How far will the killer go to see everything good about JT’s life destroyed?

My Review

Dying Games feels different to the previous instalments of JT’s story. It’s darker and closer to crime fiction than the previous books.  Although, the genealogical aspect is still entirely relevant.  Unlike the other books, there’s no switching to the historical story from the present day.

I absolutely got my teeth into Dying Games, finishing the same day I started it. Although that may have been down to the fact that every time I did anything other than read, Anwen would sit on my laptop.

I have really grown to love Jefferson Tayte over the last 6 books, and its been great to watch him develop and change since he met Jean.  In fact, I really feel connected to him.

The Jefferson Tayte series can be purchased using the links below.

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com.

 

Book Review | Kindred by Steve Robinson | A Jefferson Tayte Mystery

Book Review | Kindred by Steve Robinson | A Jefferson Tayte Mystery

I have already written about the Jefferson Tayte series written by Steve Robinson, but I’ve recently finished the fifth book in the series, Kindred.

About Kindred

JT is heading to Munich, Germany. He has Jean by his side and hopes to follow the trail and discover his own ancestry.

But is the past better off left in the past?

The closer JT gets to the truth, the more danger him and Jean find themselves in.

Will JT live long enough to find out the truth about his parents?
Will he like what he hears?

My Review

JT always finds himself in trouble and searching for his own ancestry seems to be no different.
However, I am glad that he is finally able to trace the information that is so important to him.
As always Steve tells a great story and it kept me turning the pages. The historical information behind the fiction is accurate and heartbreaking in equal measure.

The final twist though – I didn’t see it coming.

Kindred is a great read and, as usual, I can’t wait to get on with the next in the series. Although, it appears I’ve read more of the series than there are left. Any good recommendations for similar type books, anyone?

If you want to give Steve’s books a go you can buy them on the links below. They are also included in a Kindle Unlimited subscription.

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com

Book Review – The Jefferson Tayte Genealogical Series by Steve Robinson

Book Review – The Jefferson Tayte Genealogical Series by Steve Robinson

In July, I started to read the Jefferson Tayte Genealogical series by Steve Robinson. With genealogy being one of my passions, it appealed to me on more than just book level.

There are quite a few books in the series and The Lost Empress the fourth. The first three books in the series, In the Blood, To the Grave and The Last Queen of England were all great so I was really looking forward to delving into The Lost Empress.

About The Lost Empress

American genealogist Jefferson Tayte, who likes to be called JT. is back in England despite both his fear of flying and his previous near-death experiences on previous visits.

His client wants to find out more about her recently deceased grandmother. JT’s research leads him to the sinking of a passenger ship leaving Canada in 1914.

While Britain lies on the blink of war with Germany, lives are turned upside down.

Is there a connection between JT’s client’s grandmother and Alice Stilwell who disappeared when The Empress sunk and was presumed dead?

Will JT find the answers he needs for his client?

Most importantly, will he survive another visit to England?

My Review

Anything history or genealogy related always gets me hooked, particularly when the story involves intrigue, mystery and the potential to get murdered. Yes, feel free to call me morbid.

As much as I find it very hard to believe that a simple genealogist would get himself caught up in all the troubling circumstances JT seems to get himself into, the stories are great fun to read.

Part of me does feel that it sorts of sets the unrealistic expectations because family history research doesn’t always take the researcher of an exciting adventures (although I wouldn’t complain if it did.) However, the Jefferson Tayte Adventures are great for a little escapism. I do find it difficult going back to my own family history though after being on one of Its adventures.

The books are well-written and researched effectively and Steve Robinson does the background stories justice. I particularly like the historical parts of the books.

The Jefferson Tayte series is perfect for anyone who enjoys a little bit of historical fiction, with some adventure thrown in. Also, I think some family historians would enjoy it too.

If you want to read the series, you can by clicking the links below.

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com.