“[He] died in about a minute” – An early motor vehicle accident

“[He] died in about a minute” – An early motor vehicle accident

On the morning of Friday 12th February 1909 Mr James Berry Walford presided over the inquest of the death of Edgar Alfred Ferdinand Tranter.

Edgar, known by his family as Ferdinand, was baptized at Holy Trinity Church in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire on the 27th April 1898. He was the son of David Tranter and Bertha Davis of Union Road, Abergavenny.

Edgar, along with his family, spent a number of years living in Hereford before moving back to Abergavenny.

On the evening of Monday 8th February, Ferdinand was seen playing with 2 other boys in Monk Street, just a short walk from his family home in St Helens Road when he was hit by the car of Mr Douglas Graham.

Laburnum Cottage, Monk Street. The side window seen in the picture is the one that Dora JOHNS describes in her evidence.
Photograph taken c.1980
Source: http://www.abergavennystreetsurvey.co.uk/8-monk-street-laburnum-cottage/

Several people gave evidence at the inquest which resulted in Mr Graham being exonerated from blame.

Ferdinand’s father, David, told the jury that his son was “healthy, active, and had good sight and hearing”.

Mary Ann Edmunds laid out the body of Ferdinand and detailed the injuries sustained for the jury.

Dora Johns, the first person on the scene, described the accident.

Mr. Tom Williams witnessed the accident and described what had happened.

Mr. Douglas Graham gave his evidence.

The burial of Ferdinand took place the following day at Holy Trinity Church.

Relationship to me

  • Edgar Alfred Ferdinand TRANTER is the son of
  • David TRANTER, who is the brother of
  • Edgar Samuel TRANTER, who is the father of
  • Percy Howard TRANTER, who is the father of
  • Living TRANTER, who is the father of
  • Living TRANTER, who is the mother of
  • Me

Sources:

Newspaper Clippings: Abergavenny Chronicle, 12th February 1909, Welsh Newspapers Online

Photograph of Laburnum Cottage: Abergavenny Street Survey

Baptism & Burial Record: Holy Trinity Church, Abergavenny Parish Registers, Gwent Archives

Book Review – Letters from the Dead by Steve Robinson

Book Review – Letters from the Dead by Steve Robinson

That’s it! I am up to date and thoroughly unimpressed about it. What am I going to do without a dose of JT for another year? It’s taken me just over a month to get through the seven books in Steve Robinson’s genealogical mystery series. Steve, may I call you Steve? It’s been a great adventure.

Letters from the dead is the brand-new instalment released earlier this month.

About letters from the Dead

JT is back and settling into life in England with his wife, Jean, and their 5-month-old baby, Ben.

He’s getting back into rebuilding his career as a professional genealogist. The cases he has taken 0h so far have been run of the mill- that is until Damian Sinclair employs JT’s services to identify the biological father of an illegitimate ancestor-one that is linked to an Indian treasure that hasn’t been seen in over 150 years.

Finally, something for JT to get his teeth into.

Things aren’t as they first appear, Sinclair’s real motive for employing JT isn’t as innocent as he first claims.

As JT’s stay in the Scottish Highlands progresses, he realises his life could, once again, be on the line.
Will JT get out of this assignment unscathed?
What bloody secrets will be revealed?

My Review

As always JT’s adventures as a genealogist enthral me. Steve Robinson’s presentation of the multiple stories within the book is brilliant.

I am always left wondering how one genealogist can walk into so many life changing situations in

The details appear to be well researched and the part of the story taking place in India are certainly believable. Although, I know little about Indian history and must take many of the details at face Value.

I have enjoyed JT’s adventures greatly, and it’s good to see that despite settling down with his family, he still has a sense of adventure.

I am very much looking forward to the next Jefferson Tayte adventure.

The Jefferson Tayte Genealogical mystery series can be bought on Amazon using the links below.

 

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com.

 

Book Review – Dying Games by Steve Robinson

Book Review – Dying Games by Steve Robinson

I made easy work out of the first 6 of Steve Robinson’s Jefferson Tayte series, reading them within 7 weeks with other books in between.

I think the appeal of the Jefferson Tayte series is that it combines two of my favourite things – genealogy and reading. Dying Games certainly appeals to the crime fiction fan in me.

About Dying Games

After the danger of his own genealogical journey in Munich, JT and Jean are ready to take things a little easier. Planning their future is a full-time business. That is, until JT receives a call from DC.

There’s a serial killer on the loose and all the victims have one thing in common.  Jefferson Tayte.

Who is killing the relatives of JT’s previous clients?
Will JT need to play this genealogical game until the very end?
How far will the killer go to see everything good about JT’s life destroyed?

My Review

Dying Games feels different to the previous instalments of JT’s story. It’s darker and closer to crime fiction than the previous books.  Although, the genealogical aspect is still entirely relevant.  Unlike the other books, there’s no switching to the historical story from the present day.

I absolutely got my teeth into Dying Games, finishing the same day I started it. Although that may have been down to the fact that every time I did anything other than read, Anwen would sit on my laptop.

I have really grown to love Jefferson Tayte over the last 6 books, and its been great to watch him develop and change since he met Jean.  In fact, I really feel connected to him.

The Jefferson Tayte series can be purchased using the links below.

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com.

 

Starting your family tree in 5 steps

Starting your family tree in 5 steps

I have recently been thinking a lot about the time I started my family history research, the mistakes I made, and the things I wish I had known then.

I made A LOT of mistakes and, 11 years on, I am still learning but I can certainly share my view on the first 5 steps to start your family tree.

Step 1 – Write down everything you know.

The first step to creating your own family tree is to write down names, dates of birth, places of birth of any family members you have.

Start with yourself at the centre then add your parents and siblings, then your grandparents. You may find it helpful to create a tree.

At this point you don’t have to go into too much detail but it’s good to write any additional information down because you may need it later.

Step 2 – Talk to family members

This should be something we all do, even if you don’t want to start bidding your family tree. The older generations have stories to tell, Stories that will get forgotten if they don’t get told.

But, I am not saying only talk to older generations younger family members may have heard different stories, they may have heard snippets of stories as children. Every family story can have a use in family research.

One thing you, as the family historian, need to remember is that some stones are embellished over the years. BUT in every embellished family story there is some truth.

The story of my husbands’ great grandmother is testament to this. Descendants were all told She went ‘doolally! However, the truth of this can’t be proven. She disappeared sometime around 1894 and I haven’t been able to locate her anywhere. The last reference to her is related to her giving evidence at her husband’s trial for bigamy. She vanished, and he lived out the rest of his life with his third wife.

Step 3 – Organise your research so far

After following the first few steps you will probably have more than you know what to do with and despite genealogy being about more than names and dates, these are the easiest bits to record.

Find yourself some family tree building software, Ancestry and Find My Past offer a free family tree builder with their free trials but there’s also a lot more dotted around the internet. You may prefer a programme you can run on your computer. There aren’t many free ones but I’m sure you can find a decent one that’s paid for. (I’ll be writing a post on this soon).

Also, store transcripts of stories on your computer and on paper. Remember to back up everything regularly.

Oh, and get into the habit of creating sources for everything asap. it may seem pointless and tedious, but you’ll be glad you did when you revisit some one months. or years after you researched them.

Step 4 – Start your online research.

Whether you want to sign up with the major research sites or try out the free sites (such as FREEBMD, free Reg or FreeCen) you can now start proving relationships, finding people, and discovering your ancestors’ stories.

Remember to start with what you know, don’t add everyone you come across until you know they probably do belong. Highlight guesses or uncertainties.

Step 5- Confirm your research and verify your findings

This is vital. If you make a mistake early on it’s ridiculously hard to rectify. I made a huge mistake in my early days and didn’t realise for ages. By that point the mistake was so huge, it was easier for me to start a new tree.

There are several ways you can verify information, but the main sources are civil registrations of births, marriages, and deaths
(from 1837) and parish records for baptisms, marriages, and burials (from around the 16th century to present day).

Over the coming weeks I’ll detail more of these resources and guide you through them one at a time.

Book Review | Kindred by Steve Robinson | A Jefferson Tayte Mystery

Book Review | Kindred by Steve Robinson | A Jefferson Tayte Mystery

I have already written about the Jefferson Tayte series written by Steve Robinson, but I’ve recently finished the fifth book in the series, Kindred.

About Kindred

JT is heading to Munich, Germany. He has Jean by his side and hopes to follow the trail and discover his own ancestry.

But is the past better off left in the past?

The closer JT gets to the truth, the more danger him and Jean find themselves in.

Will JT live long enough to find out the truth about his parents?
Will he like what he hears?

My Review

JT always finds himself in trouble and searching for his own ancestry seems to be no different.
However, I am glad that he is finally able to trace the information that is so important to him.
As always Steve tells a great story and it kept me turning the pages. The historical information behind the fiction is accurate and heartbreaking in equal measure.

The final twist though – I didn’t see it coming.

Kindred is a great read and, as usual, I can’t wait to get on with the next in the series. Although, it appears I’ve read more of the series than there are left. Any good recommendations for similar type books, anyone?

If you want to give Steve’s books a go you can buy them on the links below. They are also included in a Kindle Unlimited subscription.

About Steve Robinson

Steve Robinson drew upon his own family history for inspiration when he imagined the life and quest of his genealogist-hero, Jefferson Tayte. The talented London-based crime writer, who was first published at age 16, always wondered about his own maternal grandfather – ‘He was an American GI billeted in England during the Second World War,’ Robinson says. ‘A few years after the war ended he went back to America, leaving a young family behind and, to my knowledge, no further contact was made. I traced him to Los Angeles through his 1943 enlistment record and discovered that he was born in Arkansas…’

Robinson cites crime writing and genealogy as ardent hobbies – a passion that is readily apparent in his work.

He can be contacted via his website www.steve-robinson.me or his blog at www.ancestryauthor.blogspot.com